Notices

Serious Debates & News Debate and discussion about political, moral, philosophical, celebrity and news topics.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 25-03-2021, 07:06 AM   #1
bitontheslide
self-oscillating
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 27,478

Favourites:
BB19: Sian


Default Middle-aged women 'worst affected by long Covid', studies find

Middle-aged women experience the most severe, long-lasting symptoms after being treated in hospital for Covid-19, two UK studies suggest.

Five months on, 70% of patients studied were still affected by everything from anxiety to breathlessness, fatigue, muscle pain and "brain fog".

But the researchers say there is no obvious link with how ill people originally became.

How women's bodies fight off illness could explain their poorer recovery.

The larger study - led by the University of Leicester - which is yet to be peer-reviewed, followed up more than 1,000 patients who had been admitted to hospital with Covid-19 in the UK last year. It found that up to 70% had not fully recovered, an average of five months after leaving hospital, with women most affected.

More than 400,000 people have been admitted to hospital with Covid in the UK since the start of the pandemic.

A separate smaller pre-print study, led by University of Glasgow, found women under 50 were seven times more likely to be more breathless, and twice as likely to report worse fatigue than men of the same age who had had the illness, seven months after hospital treatment.

In the Leicester study, these lasting 'long Covid' symptoms stopped 18% of people returning to work and forced 19% to change their job.

Despite patients receiving a range of hospital care - with most given antibiotics, one-third receiving oxygen and just over a quarter ending up in intensive care - even those who had had short hospital stays still had ongoing problems.

People who hadn't returned to normal health were more likely to be female, white, aged between approximately 40 and 60, have two or more underlying conditions, and been on a ventilator.

Dr Rachael Evans, an associate professor at the University of Leicester and respiratory consultant at Leicester's Hospitals, said, "much of the wide variety of persistent problems was not explained by the severity of the acute illness" - often characterised by lung damage.

This suggests other underlying factors may be at play, she added.
And among women, it was the middle-aged group which appeared to be worst affected by long-term health problems, while younger and older women recovered better.

Study author Dr Nazir Lone, consultant in critical care at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, said this could be because "older age groups are more likely to die" and so more younger, middle-aged women are more likely to survive with health issues.

But he also said it was possible women have "a different immune response to men". Men, however, are more likely to be admitted to hospital with Covid in the first place.

The PHOSP-Covid study also found that most people with severe, ongoing symptoms five months after leaving hospital had higher than normal levels of a chemical called CRP in their bodies, which is linked to inflammation.

This is also present in middle-aged women, who are prone to auto-immune conditions in which the body attacks its own healthy cells and organs.

"This may explain why post-Covid syndrome seems to be more prevalent in this group, but further investigation is needed to fully understand the processes," said Prof Louise Wain, chair in respiratory research at the University of Leicester.

The researchers were also able to identify four different groups or "clusters" of people based on their mental and physical health issues after Covid, with one group showing particular problems with "brain fog". They tended to be older and male.

"The evidence for different recovery 'clusters', and ongoing inflammation, really is important in guiding how we conduct further research into the underlying biological mechanisms that drive long Covid," Prof Wain said.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-56509340
bitontheslide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2021, 07:46 AM   #2
Toy Soldier
I'M LI'L JAWN!
 
Toy Soldier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: ➜
Posts: 26,780
Blog Entries: 1


Default

Is it massively different To “standard” post-viral fatigue syndrome? You can get that after many viruses though it is quite rare, and still not well understood. The symptoms sound more or less identical so are they just using “long COVID” to describe PVFS post-COVID?

The immune system does weird crap sometimes. I had a nasty unknown virus about 5 years back, and then some bizarre post-viral think for about 6 weeks after. Exhaustion, random stabbing joint pains, and the weirdest was that my temp would spike EVERY NIGHT at about 3am (I would wake up sweating like crazy and physically hot-to-touch) and would have to take a cold shower or press my whole body against the cold external wall that was next to the bed (a technique I developed after getting sick of showers in the middle of the night) to get back to sleep. Then I’d wake up in the morning fine. Went on for well over a month, it was so odd.
__________________

___________________________________
Christ, I'm a sidewinder
I'm a California King.
Toy Soldier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2021, 08:02 AM   #3
bitontheslide
self-oscillating
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 27,478

Favourites:
BB19: Sian


Default

these are very early studies, and i think in them there is a tendency to find anything of meaning to justify further funding. I view it as early areas of interest more than factual reality
bitontheslide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2021, 08:16 AM   #4
Cherie
Cherie Bomb 2020
 
Cherie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 51,003
Blog Entries: 1

Favourites:
Strictly 2020: Bill Bailey
BB19: Sian
CBB22: Hardeep Singh Kohli


Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toy Soldier View Post
Is it massively different To “standard” post-viral fatigue syndrome? You can get that after many viruses though it is quite rare, and still not well understood. The symptoms sound more or less identical so are they just using “long COVID” to describe PVFS post-COVID?

The immune system does weird crap sometimes. I had a nasty unknown virus about 5 years back, and then some bizarre post-viral think for about 6 weeks after. Exhaustion, random stabbing joint pains, and the weirdest was that my temp would spike EVERY NIGHT at about 3am (I would wake up sweating like crazy and physically hot-to-touch) and would have to take a cold shower or press my whole body against the cold external wall that was next to the bed (a technique I developed after getting sick of showers in the middle of the night) to get back to sleep. Then I’d wake up in the morning fine. Went on for well over a month, it was so odd.
Are you sure you didn't go through menopause?
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by chuff me dizzy View Post
Terrible place and the prices were stupid for a potato
Cherie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2021, 08:18 AM   #5
Cherie
Cherie Bomb 2020
 
Cherie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 51,003
Blog Entries: 1

Favourites:
Strictly 2020: Bill Bailey
BB19: Sian
CBB22: Hardeep Singh Kohli


Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bitontheslide View Post
these are very early studies, and i think in them there is a tendency to find anything of meaning to justify further funding. I view it as early areas of interest more than factual reality
its also a timely study I guess in terms of where we are in the vaccination programme with all the over 50s and clinically vulnerable of any age first jabbed by mid April they need to ramp up for the 40 pluses
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by chuff me dizzy View Post
Terrible place and the prices were stupid for a potato
Cherie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark/share this topic

Tags
affected, covid, find, long, middleaged, studies, women, worst

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:26 PM.




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
no new posts